thepeoplesrecord:

Happy Imperial New Year! The United States Army will be deploying troops to nearly three-dozen African nations in the coming year.December 24, 2012
Soldiers based out of Fort Riley, Kansas’ 2nd Brigade, 1st Infantry Division will begin training in March 2013 in order to prepare for a project that will send troops to as many as 35 African nations, the Associated Press reports.
Citing a growing threat from extremist groups, including those with ties to al-Qaeda, the Department of Defense is hoping to install American soldiers overseas in order to prepare local troops there for any future crises as tensions escalate.
Earlier this month, DoD sources with insider knowledge told the Washington Post that US troops will soon be en route to the nation of Mali in order to thwart the emerging threat of Islamic extremists, including al-Qaeda aligned insurgents. With the latest news from the Pentagon, though, Mali will be just one of many African nations hosting US troops in the coming year.
According to the AP’s update this week, soldiers will be sent overseas in the new year to assist only with training and equipping efforts, and are not necessarily permitted to participate in military operations. Should the Pentagon ask the troops to engage in battle, however, the secretary of defense could sign off on an order that would allow as much.
“If they want them for (military) operations, the brigade is our first sourcing solution because they’re prepared,” Gen. David Rodriguez, the head of U.S. Army Forces Command, tells the AP. “But that has to go back to the secretary of defense to get an execute order.”
Additionally, the AP says that US troops will head specifically to Libya, Sudan, Algeria and Niger in order to prepare for any advances from al-Qaeda linked groups. Americans will also train and equip forces in Kenya and Somalia, reportedly, in order to stand up to al-Shabab militants. Despite the troops being deployed to more than half of the countries in Africa, though, the AP reports that Uncle Sam will try to avoid giving the impression that the United States is leaving a substantial footprint across the continent.
“The challenge we have is to always understand the system in their country,”explains Rodriguez. “We’re not there to show them our system, we’re there to make their system work. Here is what their army looks like, and here is what we need to prepare them to do.”
Sources speaking with the AP say that the United States has already prepared nearly 100 different exercises and training programs to conduct with African troops during the coming year.Source

thepeoplesrecord:

Happy Imperial New Year! The United States Army will be deploying troops to nearly three-dozen African nations in the coming year.
December 24, 2012

Soldiers based out of Fort Riley, Kansas’ 2nd Brigade, 1st Infantry Division will begin training in March 2013 in order to prepare for a project that will send troops to as many as 35 African nations, the Associated Press reports.

Citing a growing threat from extremist groups, including those with ties to al-Qaeda, the Department of Defense is hoping to install American soldiers overseas in order to prepare local troops there for any future crises as tensions escalate.

Earlier this month, DoD sources with insider knowledge told the Washington Post that US troops will soon be en route to the nation of Mali in order to thwart the emerging threat of Islamic extremists, including al-Qaeda aligned insurgents. With the latest news from the Pentagon, though, Mali will be just one of many African nations hosting US troops in the coming year.

According to the AP’s update this week, soldiers will be sent overseas in the new year to assist only with training and equipping efforts, and are not necessarily permitted to participate in military operations. Should the Pentagon ask the troops to engage in battle, however, the secretary of defense could sign off on an order that would allow as much.

“If they want them for (military) operations, the brigade is our first sourcing solution because they’re prepared,” Gen. David Rodriguez, the head of U.S. Army Forces Command, tells the AP. “But that has to go back to the secretary of defense to get an execute order.”

Additionally, the AP says that US troops will head specifically to Libya, Sudan, Algeria and Niger in order to prepare for any advances from al-Qaeda linked groups. Americans will also train and equip forces in Kenya and Somalia, reportedly, in order to stand up to al-Shabab militants. Despite the troops being deployed to more than half of the countries in Africa, though, the AP reports that Uncle Sam will try to avoid giving the impression that the United States is leaving a substantial footprint across the continent.

“The challenge we have is to always understand the system in their country,”explains Rodriguez. “We’re not there to show them our system, we’re there to make their system work. Here is what their army looks like, and here is what we need to prepare them to do.”

Sources speaking with the AP say that the United States has already prepared nearly 100 different exercises and training programs to conduct with African troops during the coming year.

Source

(Source: thepeoplesrecord)

thepeoplesrecord:

Riots hint at the potential chaos in Tunisia’s future
December 8, 2012

Five days of riots last week in a town in Tunisia’s impoverished interior wounded hundreds of people and deepened the rift between the two most powerful forces in this North African country: the moderate Islamist ruling party and the main labor union.

With the two at loggerheads, the threat of a nationwide general strike next week could plunge the economically struggling country back into chaos, endangering its government and its transition to democracy nearly two years after Tunisians ousted a dictator and kicked off the Arab Spring.

Tunisians’ dissatisfaction with their post-revolution government has yet to reach the dramatic levels in Egypt, where hundreds of thousands are protesting President Mohammad Mursi’s decision to expand his powers.

But the latest tensions in Tunisia are reminiscent of the demonstrations that began there in December 2010, when a poor young fruit seller in the interior town of Sidi Bouzid set himself on fire. Those protests led, the following month, to the end of the 23-year-old dictatorship of Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali.

Today’s economic conditions and political struggles in Tunisia suggest a crisis that “is going to get worse before it gets better,” said William Lawrence, the North Africa analyst for the International Crisis Group.

In many ways, the onus is on the ruling Islamist Ennahda party to curb the disappointments of the citizens who elected it. Fourteen months after their first free multiparty election, Tunisians still suffer from the same high unemployment and police arrogance that angered them pre-revolution, and many wonder what their vote accomplished.

The anger is especially acute in the country’s interior, where residents in towns such as Siliana and Sidi Bouzid see relatively few benefits compared to coastal areas that prosper due to ports and tourist beaches. Last week’s unrest was centered in Siliana, and it ended only when soldiers arrived and the local governor was suspended.

“I expect that what happened in Siliana is going to happen in many other places in the future if this government doesn’t try to solve its problems,” said Messaoudi Romdhani, a member of the labor union that first called the strike on Nov. 27 in Siliana. “There is a total absence of communication between this government and civil society.”

After contracting in 2011, Tunisia’s economy has begun growing again. But the anemic 2.7-percent rate in 2012 will do little address the 17.6 percent-unemployment in this nation of 10 million. And places such as Siliana and Sidi Bouzid, which suffered its own riots six weeks ago, are likely to see the least improvement.

As a result, the Ennahda party faces growing accusations of economic incompetence. Many are now calling for the formation of a new government of technocrats to pull the country out of its economic hole, which has been exacerbated by the financial crisis in Europe, Tunisia’s main trading partner.

Even Tunisian President Moncef Marzouki, a member of a secular party allied with Ennahda, has called for a new government with more economic experience. “Tunisia today is at a crossroads – the road to decline or that of salvation,” he warned in a radio address on Nov. 30.

Lawrence, the North Africa analyst, said Ennahda has not proven “economically very adept.”

“There has been some creation of public jobs, public works, and some improvements in governance, and some stipends and other social aid. But nothing on the scale of the problem nationwide,” Lawrence said.

The fury over the economic problems has been compounded by allegations of continued official arrogance and police brutality – affronts to Tunisian pride.

For instance, in Siliana province, home to some 250,000 people, investment and employment dropped 40 and 60 percent respectively in 2012, according to government statistics. But Siliana’s local governor, a member of Ennahda, refused to meet with the unions to discuss the problem, leading to calls for a general strike.

The response was swift and harsh. Police attacked the demonstrators, while Prime Minister Hamadi Jebali described the entire affair as a plot by the opposition and remnants of the old regime, enraging the protesters further.

The crowds grew to more than 10,000 people, many of whom engaged in running street battles with police before the army finally arrived. Five days and more than 300 injured later the governor was suspended and the strike was called off.

Lawrence said many of the protesters had probably voted for Ennahda but now consider it responsible for Siliana’s problems and the police actions.

“They want dignified jobs, and they want to be able to protest in a dignified way without getting shot in the eye with birdshot, which is why they were lining up with Molotov cocktails for the next round,” he said. For many, the police brutality was reminiscent of the days of Ben Ali.

Ennahda is feeling pressure from more than just unions. It has to deal with Salafists, who have staged protests of their own and even attacked the U.S. Embassy in September.

Many Tunisians have linked the hardliners’ rising popularity to the country’s dismal economic prospects.

The conflict with the union also is part of a widening rift between Ennahda and secular parties in its ruling coalition, tensions that could threaten the year-old government.

“We could be on the verge of, if not a collapse of the government, then a serious challenge to Ennahda’s leadership,” Lawrence said.

The conflict with the union also is part of a widening rift between Ennahda and secular parties in its ruling coalition, tensions that could threaten the year-old government.

By Monday, the people of Siliana were cleaning up calm but devastated streets. But Tuesday in the capital Tunis, supporters of Ennahda attacked members of the country’s main labor union, the General Union of Tunisian Workers, in apparent retaliation for their support of the Siliana strike.

The head of the union then warned the “doors of confrontation were open” and announced a nationwide strike for Dec. 13. The last time the union held general strikes in 1984 and 1978, the country was convulsed by riots.

Source
Photo 1, 2, 3, 4

(Source: thepeoplesrecord)

anarcho-queer:

Egyptians Protest Against Morsi’s Power-Extenting Decree

Riot police fired tear gas to disperse crowds of people camped out at Cairo’s Tahrir Square, protesting against President Mohamed Morsi’s power-extending decree. Egypt’s top judges have demanded the leader reverse the measure.

The primary court in Alexandria, along with the judges club there, announced that they and public prosecutors have suspended all work until the declaration is withdrawn, state news agency MENA reports.

The Supreme Judicial Council called on Morsi to “distance this decree from everything that violates the judicial authority,” Mena state news agency reported. The Council also urged Morsi to reverse the declaration, calling it anunprecedented attack on the independence of the judiciary and its rulings.”  

Protesters rallied against the move over the past two days, prompting two of Morsi’s presidential aides and his Coptic Christian assistant to resign.

The demonstrations were in response to Morsi’s declaration, which was issued on Thursday. The decree protects Egypt’s constitution-drafting assembly from being dissolved, and rules that none of the leader’s decisions can be overturned.

Tens of thousands of Morsi opponents and supporters turned out in several Egyptian cities on Friday. Over 100 people were reportedly injured in clashes.

When more protesters tried to join people at Tahrir, police reportedly teargassed them, forcing them out of the square. 

Photo Credit

thepeoplesrecord:

Al Jazeera’s Cairo bureau firebombed by Egyptian protesters
November 21, 2012

Al-Jazeera’s office overlooking historical Tahrir Square in Cairo was firebombed by protesters as the third day of violent anti-government demonstrations rages on in Egypt’s capital.

The building was left gutted by the fire hours after protesters fell on the building with a volley of Molotov cocktails and gasoline bombs.

Footage broadcast on Egyptian television showed scorched lighting equipment dangling from the charred walls. No injuries were reported in the attack.

“At about 11 o’clock (1100 GMT) a group of protesters gathered near the office,” said Abdulla Ebeid, the operations manager of Al-Jazeera Mubasher Misr said.

“They started to throw rocks at us and after all the windows were broken they threw a Molotov (petrol bomb) inside the studio so that it caught on fire. And, as you can see, all the components got ruined – the cameras, lighting systems and all the equipment got burned.”

Earlier in the day,  a mob fell upon Cairo’s security chief El-Sagheer as police and hundreds of protesters violently clashed on the square.

Primarily young demonstrators have battled with police in the heart of the city since Monday. Protesters have regularly lobbed stones and firebombs at security forces, who have responded by firing birdshot and tear gas into the crowd.

An interior ministry official said 118 people had been arrested since Monday. Medics say at least 60 have been injured in the three days of violence, while one protester from the secular April 6 movement remains in critical condition, AFP reports.

Protesters have accused Al-Jazeera of being biased toward the Muslim Brotherhood.

Many secular and youth movements have grown increasingly uncomfortable with the country’s perceived shift towards theocracy.

Monday’s demonstrations erupted on the one-year anniversary of bloody street battles which left 42 people dead. Activists have called for a mass nationwide protest against the government of Mohamed Morsi on Friday.

Source

(Source: thepeoplesrecord)

thepeoplesrecord:

Climate change & Mideast insecurity: The hidden connectionNovember 4, 2012
The remarkable silence of this year’s presidential candidates on the issue of global warming was all the more notable during Monday’s debate on foreign policy. For all the talk of violent threats to American security in Syria and North Africa, neither candidate connected them to a powerful contributing cause: climate change.
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration concluded in 2011 that “human-caused climate change [is now] a major factor in more frequent Mediterranean droughts.” That helps explain why Syria for the past five years has experienced what one expert called “the worst long-term drought and most severe set of crop failures since agricultural civilizations began in the Fertile Crescent many millennia ago.”
An important article published by the Center for Climate and Security this year notes the drought — which was compounded by government mismanagement of water resources — plunged more than a million Syrians into extreme poverty and hunger. The famine prompted hundreds of thousands of people to flee their villages for the cities, at a time when the country’s social infrastructure was already burdened by the strain of housing hundreds of thousands of Iraqi refugees.
The Assad regime’s inept response to this social crisis helped fuel political protests that led to the country’s civil war when the government rebuffed them with force. “Indeed,” the authors note, “the rural farming town of Dara’a was the focal point for protests in the early stages of the opposition movement last year — a place that was especially hard hit by five years of drought and water scarcity, with little assistance from the al-Assad regime.”
Similar factors contributed to the earlier eruption of social protests across North Africa that produced the “Arab Spring,” according to a study by researchers at the New England Complex Systems Institute (NECSI). They found a powerful correlation between high food prices and mass riots. As they pointed out, “widespread unrest does not arise from long-standing political failings of the system, but rather from its sudden perceived failure to provide essential security to the population.”
Sure enough, the protests that swept the Arab world began as the Food and Agriculture Organization’s world Food Price Index peaked at nearly 240 in the winter of 2010-11, up from about 150 in 2009 and the low 100s earlier in the decade.
More trouble may be brewing in coming months if this explanation is correct. The historic U.S. drought this summer, combined with droughts in Russia and neighboring food exporters, have spurred soaring food prices. The FAO’s index hit 216 in September.
Any index reading over 210 represents a dangerously high level, according to the NECSI study. “Such a threat to security should be a key concern to policymakers worldwide,” it warned. “While some variation in the form of unrest may occur due to local differences in government, desperate populations are likely to resort to violence even in democratic regimes.”
Source

thepeoplesrecord:

Climate change & Mideast insecurity: The hidden connection
November 4, 2012

The remarkable silence of this year’s presidential candidates on the issue of global warming was all the more notable during Monday’s debate on foreign policy. For all the talk of violent threats to American security in Syria and North Africa, neither candidate connected them to a powerful contributing cause: climate change.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration concluded in 2011 that “human-caused climate change [is now] a major factor in more frequent Mediterranean droughts.” That helps explain why Syria for the past five years has experienced what one expert called “the worst long-term drought and most severe set of crop failures since agricultural civilizations began in the Fertile Crescent many millennia ago.”

An important article published by the Center for Climate and Security this year notes the drought — which was compounded by government mismanagement of water resources — plunged more than a million Syrians into extreme poverty and hunger. The famine prompted hundreds of thousands of people to flee their villages for the cities, at a time when the country’s social infrastructure was already burdened by the strain of housing hundreds of thousands of Iraqi refugees.

The Assad regime’s inept response to this social crisis helped fuel political protests that led to the country’s civil war when the government rebuffed them with force. “Indeed,” the authors note, “the rural farming town of Dara’a was the focal point for protests in the early stages of the opposition movement last year — a place that was especially hard hit by five years of drought and water scarcity, with little assistance from the al-Assad regime.”

Similar factors contributed to the earlier eruption of social protests across North Africa that produced the “Arab Spring,” according to a study by researchers at the New England Complex Systems Institute (NECSI). They found a powerful correlation between high food prices and mass riots. As they pointed out, “widespread unrest does not arise from long-standing political failings of the system, but rather from its sudden perceived failure to provide essential security to the population.”

Sure enough, the protests that swept the Arab world began as the Food and Agriculture Organization’s world Food Price Index peaked at nearly 240 in the winter of 2010-11, up from about 150 in 2009 and the low 100s earlier in the decade.

More trouble may be brewing in coming months if this explanation is correct. The historic U.S. drought this summer, combined with droughts in Russia and neighboring food exporters, have spurred soaring food prices. The FAO’s index hit 216 in September.

Any index reading over 210 represents a dangerously high level, according to the NECSI study. “Such a threat to security should be a key concern to policymakers worldwide,” it warned. “While some variation in the form of unrest may occur due to local differences in government, desperate populations are likely to resort to violence even in democratic regimes.”

Source

(Source: thepeoplesrecord)

thepeoplesrecord:

A Foreign Office spokesman on Thursday said that a protest had been lodged by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs with the US Embassy in Pakistan on drone strikes inside Pakistani territory that took place on October 10 and 11.
October 11, 2012
The Foreign Office spokesman, in a statement, said that the United States Embassy was informed that the drone strikes on Pakistani territory were a clear violation of International Law and Pakistan’s sovereignty.
These attacks are unacceptable to Pakistan, he added.
Earlier today, a US drone attack killed 16 suspected militants and injured six others in the Orakzai agency of Pakistan’s tribal region on Thursday.
Four missiles were fired in the Buland Khel area of the Orakzai agency, which is close to the borders of the North and South Waziristan tribal regions in Fata.
“The attack was aimed at the compound of Maulana Shakirullah, who is the commander of the Hafiz Gul Bahadur group of the Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP),” officials said.
Source
It should be noted that the definition of “militant” under the Obama Administration is any male over the age of 18 who is in a drone strike zone. So as we’ve pointed out before, if you’re a 76 year old male shop owner killed by a drone strike, the White House automatically reports your death as the successful assassination of a “militant”. If you’re a 19 year old student on your way home from class and you’re killed in a drone strike, the U.S. dismisses your death as the death of a militant. It’s a disgusting and unjust way to conduct foreign policy. 

thepeoplesrecord:

A Foreign Office spokesman on Thursday said that a protest had been lodged by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs with the US Embassy in Pakistan on drone strikes inside Pakistani territory that took place on October 10 and 11.

October 11, 2012

The Foreign Office spokesman, in a statement, said that the United States Embassy was informed that the drone strikes on Pakistani territory were a clear violation of International Law and Pakistan’s sovereignty.

These attacks are unacceptable to Pakistan, he added.

Earlier today, a US drone attack killed 16 suspected militants and injured six others in the Orakzai agency of Pakistan’s tribal region on Thursday.

Four missiles were fired in the Buland Khel area of the Orakzai agency, which is close to the borders of the North and South Waziristan tribal regions in Fata.

“The attack was aimed at the compound of Maulana Shakirullah, who is the commander of the Hafiz Gul Bahadur group of the Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP),” officials said.

Source

It should be noted that the definition of “militant” under the Obama Administration is any male over the age of 18 who is in a drone strike zone. So as we’ve pointed out before, if you’re a 76 year old male shop owner killed by a drone strike, the White House automatically reports your death as the successful assassination of a “militant”. If you’re a 19 year old student on your way home from class and you’re killed in a drone strike, the U.S. dismisses your death as the death of a militant. It’s a disgusting and unjust way to conduct foreign policy. 

(Source: thepeoplesrecord)

thepeoplesrecord:

Glenn Greenwald on how the US media angrily marvels at the lack of Muslim gratitude
September 15, 2012
One prominent strain shaping American reaction to the protests in the Muslim world is bafflement, and even anger, that those Muslims are not more grateful to the US. After all, goes this thinking, the US bestowed them with the gifts of freedom and democracy – the very rights they are now exercising – so how could they possibly be anything other than thankful? Under this worldview, it is especially confounding that the US, their savior and freedom-provider, would be the target of their rage.
On Wednesday, USA Today published an article with the headline “After attacks in Egypt and Libya, USA Today asks: Why?” The paper appeared to tell its readers that it was the US that freed the Egyptian people from tyranny:
“Attacks in Libya that left four US diplomats dead – including Ambassador Christopher Stevens – and a mob invasion of the US Embassy in Cairo, in which the US flag was torn to shreds, have left many to wonder: How can people the USA helped free from murderous dictators treat it in such a way?”
Did you know that the “USA helped free” Egyptians from their murderous dictator? On Thursday night, NBC News published a nine-minute reporton Brian Williams’ “Rock Center” program featuring its foreign correspondent, Richard Engel, reporting on the demonstrations in Cairo, which sounded exactly the same theme. Standing in front of protesting Egyptians in Tahrir Square, Engel informed viewers that this was all so very baffling because it was taking place “in Cairo, where the US turned its back on its old friend Hosni Mubarak”, and then added:
“It is somewhat ironic with American diplomats inside the embassy who helped to give these demonstrators, these protesters, a voice, and allowed them to actually carry out these anti-American clashes that we’re seeing right now.
That it was the US who freed Egyptians and “allowed them” the right toprotest would undoubtedly come as a great surprise to many Egyptians. That is the case even beyond the decades of arming, funding and general support from the US for their hated dictator (to his credit, Engel including a snippet of an interview with Tariq Ramadan pointing out that the US long supported the region’s dictators).
Beyond the long-term US support for Mubarak, Egyptians would likely find it difficult to reconcile Engel’s claim that the US freed them with the”made in USA” logos on the tear gas cannisters used against them by Mubarak’s security forces; or with Hillary Clinton’s touching 2009 declaration that “I really consider President and Mrs Mubarak to be friends of my family”; or with Obama’s support for Mubarak up until the very last minute when his downfall became inevitable; or with the fact that the Obama administration plan was to engineer the ascension of the loathed, US-loyal torturer Omar Suleiman as Mubarak’s replacement in the name of “stability”.
Given the history of the US in Egypt, both long-term and very recent, it takes an extraordinary degree of self-delusion and propaganda to depict Egyptian anger toward the US as “ironic” on the ground that it was the US who freed them and “allowed” them the right to protest. But that is precisely the theme being propagated by most US media outlets.
Read more

thepeoplesrecord:

Glenn Greenwald on how the US media angrily marvels at the lack of Muslim gratitude

September 15, 2012

One prominent strain shaping American reaction to the protests in the Muslim world is bafflement, and even anger, that those Muslims are not more grateful to the US. After all, goes this thinking, the US bestowed them with the gifts of freedom and democracy – the very rights they are now exercising – so how could they possibly be anything other than thankful? Under this worldview, it is especially confounding that the US, their savior and freedom-provider, would be the target of their rage.

On Wednesday, USA Today published an article with the headline “After attacks in Egypt and Libya, USA Today asks: Why?” The paper appeared to tell its readers that it was the US that freed the Egyptian people from tyranny:

“Attacks in Libya that left four US diplomats dead – including Ambassador Christopher Stevens – and a mob invasion of the US Embassy in Cairo, in which the US flag was torn to shreds, have left many to wonder: How can people the USA helped free from murderous dictators treat it in such a way?”

Did you know that the “USA helped free” Egyptians from their murderous dictator? On Thursday night, NBC News published a nine-minute reporton Brian Williams’ “Rock Center” program featuring its foreign correspondent, Richard Engel, reporting on the demonstrations in Cairo, which sounded exactly the same theme. Standing in front of protesting Egyptians in Tahrir Square, Engel informed viewers that this was all so very baffling because it was taking place “in Cairo, where the US turned its back on its old friend Hosni Mubarak”, and then added:

“It is somewhat ironic with American diplomats inside the embassy who helped to give these demonstrators, these protesters, a voice, and allowed them to actually carry out these anti-American clashes that we’re seeing right now.

That it was the US who freed Egyptians and “allowed them” the right toprotest would undoubtedly come as a great surprise to many Egyptians. That is the case even beyond the decades of arming, funding and general support from the US for their hated dictator (to his credit, Engel including a snippet of an interview with Tariq Ramadan pointing out that the US long supported the region’s dictators).

Beyond the long-term US support for Mubarak, Egyptians would likely find it difficult to reconcile Engel’s claim that the US freed them with the”made in USA” logos on the tear gas cannisters used against them by Mubarak’s security forces; or with Hillary Clinton’s touching 2009 declaration that “I really consider President and Mrs Mubarak to be friends of my family”; or with Obama’s support for Mubarak up until the very last minute when his downfall became inevitable; or with the fact that the Obama administration plan was to engineer the ascension of the loathed, US-loyal torturer Omar Suleiman as Mubarak’s replacement in the name of “stability”.

Given the history of the US in Egypt, both long-term and very recent, it takes an extraordinary degree of self-delusion and propaganda to depict Egyptian anger toward the US as “ironic” on the ground that it was the US who freed them and “allowed” them the right to protest. But that is precisely the theme being propagated by most US media outlets.

Read more

(Source: thepeoplesrecord)

thepeoplesrecord:

Bahrain continues the revolution: Bahraini anti-government protesters run for cover from tear gas fired by riot police during a demonstration in the capital Manama on September 7, 2012.

thepeoplesrecord:

Bahrain continues the revolution: Bahraini anti-government protesters run for cover from tear gas fired by riot police during a demonstration in the capital Manama on September 7, 2012.

(via thepeoplesrecord)

occupyallstreets:

 A protester sits on a tree as others argue during a protest in Tahrir square in Cairo June 3, 2012. 
Egyptian pro-democracy campaigners called for a new uprising on Sunday, enraged that a court had spared former leader Hosni Mubarak his life over the killing of protesters during the street revolt that ended his three-decade rule.
Source

occupyallstreets:

A protester sits on a tree as others argue during a protest in Tahrir square in Cairo June 3, 2012.

Egyptian pro-democracy campaigners called for a new uprising on Sunday, enraged that a court had spared former leader Hosni Mubarak his life over the killing of protesters during the street revolt that ended his three-decade rule.

Source

(via anarcho-queer)

thepeoplesrecord:

Tahrir Square erupts after Mubarak verdict (photo)June 3, 2012
Pro-democracy protesters called for another revolution today after packing into Tahrir Square last night following the verdict that Hosni Mubarak’s two sons would be acquitted of all charges and set free. His senior policemen were also found innocent on corruption charges. 
Although Hosni Mubarak was served a life sentence, justice was not fully served as many of Mubarak’s officials went free after carrying out orders to kill protesters during the height of the Arab Spring in 2011. Demonstrators were enraged that Mubarak’s life was spared with a soft jail sentence as thousands of family members of revolutionaries killed under the regime took to the streets.  
Protesters in Tahrir Square are raising tensions leading up to Egypt’s first free presidential election, in which former Mubarak prime minister Ahmed Shafiq is grasping the lead ahead of Mohamed Mursi of the Muslim Brotherhood. Revolutionary candidate Hamdeen Sabahi lost in the first round of elections last month.
Anti-regime demonstrators fear Saturday’s sentence could prove that the Mubarak era of oppression is not over and may even continue with a vengeance if Shafiq is elected. 
“This was not a fair verdict and there is mass rejection of the judge’s ruling,” said one protester, Amr Magdy. “Tahrir will fill up again with protesters. In Egypt the only way you can get any justice is by protesting because all the institutions are still controlled by Mubarak figures.”

thepeoplesrecord:

Tahrir Square erupts after Mubarak verdict (photo)
June 3, 2012

Pro-democracy protesters called for another revolution today after packing into Tahrir Square last night following the verdict that Hosni Mubarak’s two sons would be acquitted of all charges and set free. His senior policemen were also found innocent on corruption charges. 

Although Hosni Mubarak was served a life sentence, justice was not fully served as many of Mubarak’s officials went free after carrying out orders to kill protesters during the height of the Arab Spring in 2011. Demonstrators were enraged that Mubarak’s life was spared with a soft jail sentence as thousands of family members of revolutionaries killed under the regime took to the streets.  

Protesters in Tahrir Square are raising tensions leading up to Egypt’s first free presidential election, in which former Mubarak prime minister Ahmed Shafiq is grasping the lead ahead of Mohamed Mursi of the Muslim Brotherhood. Revolutionary candidate Hamdeen Sabahi lost in the first round of elections last month.

Anti-regime demonstrators fear Saturday’s sentence could prove that the Mubarak era of oppression is not over and may even continue with a vengeance if Shafiq is elected. 

“This was not a fair verdict and there is mass rejection of the judge’s ruling,” said one protester, Amr Magdy. “Tahrir will fill up again with protesters. In Egypt the only way you can get any justice is by protesting because all the institutions are still controlled by Mubarak figures.”

(Source: thepeoplesrecord)