fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Poor People’s March from Baltimore to Washington, D.C., May 11, 2013.

Photos by Mollie Costello

dendroica:


Except for a troubling decline in underwater grasses that help filter pollution and sustain marine life, many of the bay’s health indicators remained the same or improved since they were examined two years ago, according to the 2012 State of the Bay report released Wednesday by the Chesapeake Bay Foundation….
The Chesapeake is the nation’s largest estuary, a 200-mile-long mix of fresh and salt water that supports more than 3,500 plant and animal species. Thirty-two is the highest grade the foundation has dished out since it was founded in the late 1960s. The lowest, 23, was issued in the early 1980s….
The report follows upbeat announcements from Virginia and Maryland that the oyster population, decimated by disease, is showing signs of a rebound. Virginia watermen harvested only 79,600 bushels of oysters in 2005 but hauled in more than 236,000 bushels in 2011. Maryland’s crop jumped from 26,400 to more than 121,000.
Blue crabs were even more robust, as the number of juvenile crabs in both states shot up from 207 million in the winter dredge survey of 2011 to more than 600 million last year. The growth followed the closing five years ago of the winter dredge fishery, in which watermen harvested mostly pregnant females with a steel dragnet, killing as many as they caught. The overall crab population grew from 250 million when dredge fishing was closed to more than 750 million last year.
A 2011 study by Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science found that cleanup efforts have reduced oxygen-deprived events in the bay known as dead zones. Last year’s dead zone plague, which basically kills fish, oysters and crabs almost on contact, was the second-smallest since 1985.

(via Chesapeake Bay’s health improving slightly, report says - The Washington Post)

dendroica:

Except for a troubling decline in underwater grasses that help filter pollution and sustain marine life, many of the bay’s health indicators remained the same or improved since they were examined two years ago, according to the 2012 State of the Bay report released Wednesday by the Chesapeake Bay Foundation….

The Chesapeake is the nation’s largest estuary, a 200-mile-long mix of fresh and salt water that supports more than 3,500 plant and animal species. Thirty-two is the highest grade the foundation has dished out since it was founded in the late 1960s. The lowest, 23, was issued in the early 1980s….

The report follows upbeat announcements from Virginia and Maryland that the oyster population, decimated by disease, is showing signs of a rebound. Virginia watermen harvested only 79,600 bushels of oysters in 2005 but hauled in more than 236,000 bushels in 2011. Maryland’s crop jumped from 26,400 to more than 121,000.

Blue crabs were even more robust, as the number of juvenile crabs in both states shot up from 207 million in the winter dredge survey of 2011 to more than 600 million last year. The growth followed the closing five years ago of the winter dredge fishery, in which watermen harvested mostly pregnant females with a steel dragnet, killing as many as they caught. The overall crab population grew from 250 million when dredge fishing was closed to more than 750 million last year.

A 2011 study by Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science found that cleanup efforts have reduced oxygen-deprived events in the bay known as dead zones. Last year’s dead zone plague, which basically kills fish, oysters and crabs almost on contact, was the second-smallest since 1985.

(via Chesapeake Bay’s health improving slightly, report says - The Washington Post)

theworldwelivein:

Violettes Lock | Potomac River, Darnestown, Maryland© rablot

theworldwelivein:

Violettes Lock | Potomac River, Darnestown, Maryland
© rablot

sarahlee310:

bohemianarthouse:

Tumblr, I give you Martin O’Malley the Governor of Maryland
What a BAMF

Beautiful!

sarahlee310:

bohemianarthouse:

Tumblr, I give you Martin O’Malley the Governor of Maryland

What a BAMF

Beautiful!

sarahlee310:

With the vote, the measure moves to Gov. Martin O’Malley (D), who has said he will sign it.

Congratulations, Maryland!

npr:

Experts say the Great Recession is erasing slow but steady economic gains made by blacks in recent decades. The foreclosure crisis is having a particularly devastating impact, they say, erasing years of racial progress. (via Racial Gap In Homeownership Widens In U.S. Slump : NPR)
Graphic Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Graphic Credit: Alyson Hurt/NPR

npr:

Experts say the Great Recession is erasing slow but steady economic gains made by blacks in recent decades. The foreclosure crisis is having a particularly devastating impact, they say, erasing years of racial progress. (via Racial Gap In Homeownership Widens In U.S. Slump : NPR)

Graphic Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Graphic Credit: Alyson Hurt/NPR

fuckyeahdrugpolicy:

Obama says he’s not willing to end the drug war | The Raw Story

“Much is being asked of our generation,” a doctoral student named Steve told the president at a town hall event in Maryland. “So, when are our economic perspectives going to be addressed? For example, when is the war on drugs in society going to be abandoned and be replaced by a more sophisticated and cost effective program of rehabilitation such as the one in Portugal?”
“I have stated repeatedly — and it’s actually reflected in our most recent statement by our office of drug policy — that we need to have an approach that emphasizes prevention, treatment, a public health model for reducing drug use in our country,” Obama said. “We’ve got to put more resources into that. We can’t simply focus on interdiction because, frankly, no matter how good of a job we’re doing when it comes to an interdiction approach, if there is high demand in this country for drugs, we are going to continue to see not only drug use but also the violence associated with the drug trade.”
After several minutes of explaining U.S. efforts to help Mexico fight transnational drug dealers, the president got to the point.
“Just to make sure that I’m actually answering your question, am I willing to pursue a decriminalization strategy as an approach? No.”
“But I am willing to make sure that we’re putting more resources on the treatment and prevention side,” Obama added. +

All talk, no walk.

fuckyeahdrugpolicy:

Obama says he’s not willing to end the drug war | The Raw Story

“Much is being asked of our generation,” a doctoral student named Steve told the president at a town hall event in Maryland. “So, when are our economic perspectives going to be addressed? For example, when is the war on drugs in society going to be abandoned and be replaced by a more sophisticated and cost effective program of rehabilitation such as the one in Portugal?”

“I have stated repeatedly — and it’s actually reflected in our most recent statement by our office of drug policy — that we need to have an approach that emphasizes prevention, treatment, a public health model for reducing drug use in our country,” Obama said. “We’ve got to put more resources into that. We can’t simply focus on interdiction because, frankly, no matter how good of a job we’re doing when it comes to an interdiction approach, if there is high demand in this country for drugs, we are going to continue to see not only drug use but also the violence associated with the drug trade.”

After several minutes of explaining U.S. efforts to help Mexico fight transnational drug dealers, the president got to the point.

“Just to make sure that I’m actually answering your question, am I willing to pursue a decriminalization strategy as an approach? No.”

“But I am willing to make sure that we’re putting more resources on the treatment and prevention side,” Obama added. +

All talk, no walk.

sarahlee310:

This privatization BS is going on all over the Country - in small towns and countys as well as with state governments.  Demonstrating again why elections and voting do matter….

Now, another revolution could be fomenting as Frederick County considers a radical change to the way it does government business: It is debating whether to outsource many of its public services to private business, road maintenance and parks and recreation programs, budgeting in the finance department and Central Booking at the jail. Should that happen, the county of 233,000 residents would become the largest U.S. jurisdiction to privatize what have traditionally been services provided by public employees.

The proposal, launched by an all-Republican Board of County Commissioners that after last year’s elections took on a more conservative, smaller-government cast, has created an uproar. More than 500 county residents and employees descended on Winchester Hall in Frederick, the seat of the county government, for a public hearing on the proposal last week — the first of several scheduled for this month — with most opposing it, and vocally so.

“I think a lot of people wanted to make a point,” Mike Ramsburg, a county employee for 26 of his 47 years, said after speaking at the often raucous hearing. “[County Commission Chairman] Blaine Young often says that since he received so many votes, he had a mandate. But we didn’t vote for them to dismantle Frederick County government.”

[…]

Porter said a big part of the savings comes from unloading the cost of health insurance and pensions for the employees whose jobs are taken over by a contractor. “That’s what’s sinking so many governments, they’re saddled with long-term benefits,” he said.

But Mildred E. Warner, a Cornell University professor who has researched government privatization, said she and two colleagues analyzed every published econometric study of water distribution and solid waste collection — the two most commonly privatized local services — and found no cost savings.

Warner, a professor of city and regional planning, said local jurisdictions are continually experimenting with outsourcing, letting out new contracts even as they decided to pull other work back in. “Sometimes, you need that guy down the hall,” she said.

Warner said surveys by the International City County Management Association show that the amount of work that is outsourced is continually in flux, with local governments trying out a company and either shifting the work to another contractor or returning the task to in-house staff. Cities and counties most often cite problems with the quality of service and unrealized cost savings as their reasons for deciding to end the outside contract, she said.

“There was this notion that private providers could do it for less,” Warner said. “What [government officials] discovered was there weren’t the savings expected.”

landscapelifescape:

Annapolis, Maryland, USA
Spinnaker Run (by I♥RainyDays)

landscapelifescape:

Annapolis, Maryland, USA

Spinnaker Run (by I♥RainyDays)

In Tallahassee, Florida, a Florida Department of Corrections guard was arrested last Thursday on charges he tried to traffic cocaine to prisoners where he worked. Guard Eric James, 34, was arrested in a sting operation in a local Walmart parking lot as he attempted to buy cocaine to smuggle into the prison. The guy he was getting the cocaine from was actually an undercover officer with the Lake County Sheriff’s Office Narcotics Unit. He is charged with bribery and cocaine trafficking. James is being held in the Leon County Jail on $10,000 bond.

In Boston, a Massachusetts prison guard pleaded guilty in federal court Tuesday to trying to smuggle heroin to sell to inmates at a medium-security prison near Boston. Ronald McGinn Jr. went down after the state Department of Corrections told the FBI someone was smuggling drugs into the prison, and the FBI sent in an undercover officer. McGinn sent text messages and discussed with the officer the amounts he would smuggle and the fees he would charge. He was arrested in possession of 29 grams of heroin in April. He pleaded guilty to possession of heroin with intent to distribute and faces up to 20 years in prison when sentenced in September.

In Greenbelt, Maryland, a former Prince George’s County police officer pleaded guilty Tuesday to selling cocaine and other charges. Sinisa Simic went down in a sweeping federal investigation of corruption in the county. He admitted that he and another man had sold more than 600 grams of cocaine in return for $24,000, as well as protecting shipments of contraband cigarettes. He pleaded guilty to cocaine trafficking, extortion, and two firearms offenses, and faces a mandatory minimum 10-year federal prison sentence when he returns to court for sentencing in September.

(Source: fuckyeahdrugpolicy)