thepeoplesrecord:

Yemeni tribesmen protest against US drone strikes killing civiliansJanuary 4, 2013
Dozens of armed tribesmen took to the streets in southern Yemen on Friday to protest against drone strikes that they say have killed innocent civilians and increased anger against the United States.
A drone killed at least three suspected al Qaeda militants including a local commander in the town of Redaa on Thursday, the fifth strike by a pilotless plane in the area in 10 days.
One tribesman participating in a sit-in in front of the government administration building in Redaa told Reuters by telephone that at least seven innocent civilians were killed in the recent raids.
“If the authorities don’t stop the American attacks then we will occupy the government institutions in the town,” he said.
Another said: “The government has opened up the country to the Americans so that they can kill Muslims.” The protesters were carrying rifles, as Yemeni tribesmen usually do, and there was no report of violence.
Separately, an army officer was kidnapped by suspected drug traffickers in Yemen’s eastern region of Hadramout, a local security official told Reuters, declining to be identified.
The kidnapping, which happened in the desert near the Saudi border, was thought to be a revenge act against an army operation against drug trade in the area three days ago that forced a group of traffickers to flee, the source said.
ORDERS
Yemeni officials will not comment on who exactly carries out drone attacks and on whose orders. Yemeni President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi spoke openly in favor of the strikes during a trip to the United States in September.
Praised by the U.S. ambassador in Sanaa as being more effective against al Qaeda than his predecessor, Hadi was quoted as saying that he personally approved every attack. Hadi has not commented on the most recent strikes.
Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) is considered by Western governments to be the most active and dangerous wing of the global network, and has attempted a number of attacks against U.S. targets.
Redaa was the scene in September of the killing of at least 10 civilians including a 10-year-old girl in an air strike that apparently missed its intended target, a car carrying militants nearby, tribal officials and residents said.
In 2011, AQAP offshoot, Ansar al-Sharia (Partisan of Islamic Law), seized a number of towns in the south that were retaken by the government in a U.S.-backed offensive in June.
Source

thepeoplesrecord:

Yemeni tribesmen protest against US drone strikes killing civilians
January 4, 2013

Dozens of armed tribesmen took to the streets in southern Yemen on Friday to protest against drone strikes that they say have killed innocent civilians and increased anger against the United States.

A drone killed at least three suspected al Qaeda militants including a local commander in the town of Redaa on Thursday, the fifth strike by a pilotless plane in the area in 10 days.

One tribesman participating in a sit-in in front of the government administration building in Redaa told Reuters by telephone that at least seven innocent civilians were killed in the recent raids.

“If the authorities don’t stop the American attacks then we will occupy the government institutions in the town,” he said.

Another said: “The government has opened up the country to the Americans so that they can kill Muslims.” The protesters were carrying rifles, as Yemeni tribesmen usually do, and there was no report of violence.

Separately, an army officer was kidnapped by suspected drug traffickers in Yemen’s eastern region of Hadramout, a local security official told Reuters, declining to be identified.

The kidnapping, which happened in the desert near the Saudi border, was thought to be a revenge act against an army operation against drug trade in the area three days ago that forced a group of traffickers to flee, the source said.

ORDERS

Yemeni officials will not comment on who exactly carries out drone attacks and on whose orders. Yemeni President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi spoke openly in favor of the strikes during a trip to the United States in September.

Praised by the U.S. ambassador in Sanaa as being more effective against al Qaeda than his predecessor, Hadi was quoted as saying that he personally approved every attack. Hadi has not commented on the most recent strikes.

Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) is considered by Western governments to be the most active and dangerous wing of the global network, and has attempted a number of attacks against U.S. targets.

Redaa was the scene in September of the killing of at least 10 civilians including a 10-year-old girl in an air strike that apparently missed its intended target, a car carrying militants nearby, tribal officials and residents said.

In 2011, AQAP offshoot, Ansar al-Sharia (Partisan of Islamic Law), seized a number of towns in the south that were retaken by the government in a U.S.-backed offensive in June.

Source

(Source: thepeoplesrecord)

Three killed by US drone strike in Yemen

thepeoplesrecord:

October 28, 2012

At least three people have been killed in US assassination drone attacks in the northern Yemeni province of Sa’ada as Washington continues its illegal air strikes using unmanned planes in the country.

According to tribal sources, the victims were killed after a US drone hit three separate targets in Wadi al-Abu Jabara, some 250 kilometers north of the Yemeni capital, on Sunday, AFP reported. 

The attack comes four days after rockets fired from a US drone killed at least seven people near the southern Yemeni city of Jaar in Abyan province. 

People of Sa’ada have released several statements denouncing the presence of unmanned US drones flying over their country in recent weeks. 

Washington uses its assassination drones in Yemen, Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Somalia, claiming that they target the terrorists while the attacks mostly led to massive civilian casualties. 

The United Nations has censured the US drone attacks as targeted killings, stressing that they flout international law. 

According to a recent report by Yemen’s National Organization for Defending Rights and Freedoms, over 300 people have been killed in US drone attacks carried out in the southern regions of the country so far in 2012. 

Reports, however, say that the CIA is seeking to expand its covert drone attacks in Yemen, despite the fact that the airstrikes mostly result in civilian casualties. 

Source

President Obama has redefined the word “militant” to mean any male of military age in a strike zone; this has caused the number of civilian casualties to be lower than it actually is & under-reported by American media. 

(Source: thepeoplesrecord)

"

When you are tortured … they beat and beat you until everything is pain. Until there is so much pain that you give up thinking it will stop. In fact you stop hoping it will stop… . Then suddenly, one day, your cell opens and in comes a “nice” fellow who offers you a cigarette. For him you will do everything, anything.

[A Sinhalese] General told me that counter-insurgency is just like that except that instead of giving pain to a person you give pain to a whole community until it too stops hoping it will stop and starts only hoping for the lesser pain. Then you come in as the “nice fellow” and offer them a cigarette, or a constitution, and they will do anything for you.”5

What Sivaram described is strikingly reminiscent of the current situation in northwest Pakistan. Drones may have proven unreliable as tools of precision warfare, but they have yielded unexpected dividends as vehicles of state terror. Although the details of drone strategy remain secret, it appears that the US is consciously using “collectivized torture” as a means of coercing popular consent, not only in Pakistan but also in Yemen, Afghanistan, Somalia, North Africa, and other flashpoints of resistance to US domination.

"

— From “Collectivized Torture”: Drone Warfare and the Dark Side of Counterinsurgency by Jacob Levich (via thepeoplesrecord)

(Source: thepeoplesrecord)

"Drone attacks do raise serious questions about compliance with international law. I see the indiscriminate killings and injuries of civilians, in any circumstances, as human rights violations. So therefore I stress the importance of investigating such cases and ensuring compensation and redress to the victims."

— Navi Pillay, United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. So far, this has been the UN’s biggest condemnation of Obama’s drone war. In the latest incident, a US drone killed 16 people in Pakistan on Monday. (via thepeoplesrecord)

(Source: thepeoplesrecord)

thepeoplesrecord:

International Uprising Pushes Onward - May Global Round-up
June 2, 2012 

The global working class is continuing to feed off of one another’s momentum to strengthen the wave of international protest. Momentous protests have propelled international social movements to continue the plight for human rights, educational opportunities and for an end to all wars.

The historical significance of the surge of political protests throughout the world is immense. In times of upheaval, we have seen great social and political changes in the aftermath. This progress is not because of any given political party in office at that time, but because of the people in the streets demanding a better life. From toppling oppressive regimes to reclaiming basic human rights, massive demonstrations generate a Domino effect that triggers other uprisings to carry on the flood of global resistance.

The international working class is no longer putting up with corrupt capitalist agendas, environmental degradation, crashing economies or skyrocketing poverty. But as the mainstream media remains nearly silent on these waves of protest, these activist communities must not be ignored, and their causes must be recognized as one world struggle.

The May Day protests on May 1 breathed a revolutionary life into the spring offensive across the world. These are the events that marked the international surge of resistance in the month of May:

May 1

  • More than 1,500 Palestinian prisoners participated in a mass hunger strike in the occupied territories of the West Bank and Gaza to oppose the wrongful imprisonment of thousands of Palestinians, horrific prison conditions and inhumane treatment during their incarceration without formal charges. Ten hunger-strikers were hospitalized by the end of the strike. Israeli officials compromised a deal to allow solitary confinement prisoners to be returned to the other areas of the prison as well as to allow family visits.
  • Cities all over the world, from Paris, Oslo, Madrid, New York City, Montreal and Palestine, celebrated May Day in solidarity with all working class groups everywhere.

May 2

  • South Koreans held a candlelit rally to demand the government stop food imports from the United States because of high rates of food poisoning and mad cow disease.

May 3

  • Syrian security forces kill four in a student protest at Aleppo University when administrators announced it would suspend classes. Protesters also marched opposing President Bashar al-Assad.

May 4

  • Thousands occupied Tahrir Square in Egypt to oppose the country’s brutal military rule as police violence left at least nine dead in the streets of Cairo.

May 5

  • 106 activists were arrested outside of Quebec’s liberal party headquarters demanding an end to tuition hikes. Three were hospitalized, and one protester lost the use of an eye as police shot rubber bullets and fired tear gas at protesters.

May 6

  • A dozen California State University students announced they would go on a hunger strike to call for a five-year moratorium on tuition fee increases and a cut on executive pay.

May 8

  • About 20 protesters were arrested in Nepal after the government forcefully evicted residents in Katmandu. Dozens were injured as riot police demolished homes and forced families to relocate.

May 9

  • Hundreds marched outside of the Bank of America shareholders meeting in Charlotte, North Carolina to protest foreclosures across the country. Four people were arrested.

May 10

May 11

  • Yemeni protesters sat in the streets in protest calling for a trial of former president Ali Abdullah Seleh and for the removal of his relatives from military positions.

May 12

  • Los Indignados of Spain celebrated their one-year anniversary with tens of thousands filling the streets to stand up against poverty and unemployment rates throughout the country in the anti-austerity movement.
  • Hundreds mobilized in Addison, Texas to fight against the Trans-Pacific Partnership, which some say is a revised version of the NATO treaty.

May 13

  • dozen Russian writers led a protest of more than 10,000 people to oppose the Putin regime. The march stopped traffic for miles, and no arrests were made.

May 14

  • Eight anti-NATO protesters were arrested outside of the Barack Obama headquarters after rallying for an end to all wars across the world.

May 15

  • Thousands of Palestinians commemorated Nakba Day, which marks the day in 1948 when the state of Israel was established and began the displacement, murder and imprisonment of thousands of Palestinian families.

May 16

  • Hundreds of protesters took the streets of Chile as a part of the Chilean Student Movement to demand free education.
  • More than 30 activists were arrested after police evicted Occupy Moscow. About 10,000 people joined in the march as a part of the anti-austerity movement throughout Europe.

May 17

  • Houston activists gathered at the county court house to demand justice for black 15-year-old teenager Chad Holley, who was beaten to death by a white former police officer who was acquitted of all charges.
  • Countless protests erupted as NATO negotiations took place in Chicago. Thousands of activists descended upon the city to protest against global wars.

May 18

  • The Nurses rally invades Chicago over the NATO Summit weekend to march for a Robin Hood tax that would impose higher taxes on the rich.

May 19

  • Frankfurt hosted massive demonstrations continuing to fuel the opposition to harsh austerity measures throughout Germany. More than 30,000 protesters demonstrated at the largest rally.

May 20

  • Protests at the NATO Summit in Chicago turn violent when police officers club demonstrators and journalists  bloody and arrest 60.

May 21

May 22

  • Canada saw its largest act of civil disobedience when nearly 250,000 marched in defiance of Bill 78, which limits protesters’ rights to demonstrate.

May 24

  • A Mexican student movement, “Yo Soy 132,” begins with thousands marching in Mexico City fighting for fair media coverage of upcoming presidential elections, an end to political corruption and more access to education.
  • Protesters gather outside of the Amazon Shareholders meeting to demand the company drop its membership to the American Legislative Exchange Council. Amazon later on announced it would drop its ALEC membership.

May 26

  • Striking workers shut down the Golden Gate ferry to demand fair compensation as workers, especially during holiday weekends.
  • Thousands of activists rally across the world after the Houla massacre in Syria on May 25.

May 27

  • About 1,000 people protested in North Carolina against Pastor Charles Worley, who told his congregation the Bible opposed homosexuality and that the LGBTQ community should be kept within an electric fence.

May 28

  • Anti-government protests have sparked in Georgia with up to 100,000 demonstrators demanding an end to corruption and military rule.
  • 50,000 people descended upon Casablanca to protest a growing unemployment rate and human rights violations by the Moroccan government.
  • Two Tibetan monks self-immolated in protest against Chinese occupation of Tibet.
  • A protester burst into a courtroom where ex-Prime Minister Tony Blair was speaking and yelled that Blair was a “war criminal” for his role in the Iraq War.
  • 500 lawyers and legal professionals march through Montreal to protest Bill 78, which requires all protests be approved by authorities beforehand.

May 29

  • Egyptian protesters set the home of presidential candidate and ex-Gadafi official Amhad Shafik ablaze to protest the first round of the country’s presidential election. Thousands gathered in Tahrir Square later that night.

May 30

  • Spanish miners blocked a highway in opposition to budget cuts for the mining sector, threatening jobs, healthcare and pensions for workers.
  • International marches of support for Wikileaks founder and journalist Julian Assange sprung up the day the whistleblower’s extradition to Sweden was ordered.
  • Nepalese protesters take the streets of Kathmandu demanding Prime Minister Baburam Bhattarai’s resignation.

May 31

  • Fourteen Occupiers were arrested while trying to protect a family’s home from foreclosure in Minneapolis.
  • Six Occupy Albany protesters were arrested during a rally to demand a minimum wage increase outside of the office of Senate Majority Leader Dean Skelos.
  • About 40 students and administrators occupied the Office of Admissions at the University of California at Los Angeles to protest the university’s admissions procedures, which they say discriminate against minorities.


- G. Razo

For more Global Round-Ups from thepeoplesrecord.com, click here.

(via thepeoplesrecord)

thepeoplesrecord:

Syrians living in Yemen shout slogans against Syria’s President Bashar Al-Assad during a rally in Sanaa June 1, 2012. The rally was held to condemn last week’s massacre of more than 100 people in the Syrian town of Houla, which the United Nations said appears to have been the work of the Syrian army and pro-Assad militiamen. Damascus blamed the atrocity on the rebels. 

thepeoplesrecord:

Syrians living in Yemen shout slogans against Syria’s President Bashar Al-Assad during a rally in Sanaa June 1, 2012. The rally was held to condemn last week’s massacre of more than 100 people in the Syrian town of Houla, which the United Nations said appears to have been the work of the Syrian army and pro-Assad militiamen. Damascus blamed the atrocity on the rebels. 

(via thepeoplesrecord)

theamericanbear:

In response to the news, White House approves broader Yemen drone campaign (WaPo), Greenwald writes:

So here’s yet another war that Obama is escalating, now ordering people’s death with greater degrees of recklessness, now without even bothering to know who is being targeted. Although Miller doesn’t bother to mention the likelihood of more deaths of innocent Yemenis, this is the same policy that has caused large numbers of civilian deaths in Pakistan (just read this heart-wrenching and amazing account of a 16-year-old Pakistani boy, Tariq Aziz, oh-so-coincidentally killed by an American drone, along with his 12-year-old cousin, just days after he attended a meeting to protest civilian deaths by drones). Anonymous officials claim that greater caution will be exercised in Yemen than in Pakistan, a claim Miller uncritically prints, but these types of nameless strikes are certain to kill far more civilians. Indeed, the oh-so-coincidental killing of Anwar Awlaki’s 16-year-old American son in Yemen a mere two weeks after his father was killed proves how easily civilians were already being killed. The problem will only worsen now. As Johnsen pointed out, “in Yemen, just because it has a beard, carries a gun, and talks about Islamic law doesn’t mean its al-Qaeda,” but no matter: that’s who will now be extinguished by Obama’s drone campaign.

Beyond the moral aspect — which Serious People do not comment upon, since it implies that the U.S. does not have the right to kill whomever it wants: only strategic objections are permitted — it is crystal clear that, as usual, this aggression will only worsen the very problem it is ostensibly intended to solve. A Wall Street Journal article today quotes proponents of this policy as pointing out that “[Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula] AQAP has grown stronger since one of its prominent leaders, American-born Muslim cleric Anwar al-Awlaki, was killed in a U.S. strike in September.” No kidding: it’s been the case for a full decade now, as the Pentagon well knows, that nothing strengthens Terrorism more than constant American aggression in that region. In February, Jeremy Schaill returned from Yemen and documented how U.S. drone attacks are the primary source of Al Qaeda’s strength in that country. As Johnsen put it last night, pointing to the Wall Street Journal article: “As AQAP continues to grow over the next year in Yemen remember this article and the US decision.”

Read the whole piece

(via randomactsofchaos)

darling80m:

Seeking the Truth: Obama Administration Targeted Killing Strike Killed Dozens of Women, Children in Yemen

This was the Obama administration’s first known missile strike in Yemen, carried out with one or more cruise missiles launched from an American warship or submarine on December 17, 2009. The U.S. military reportedly used cluster bombs, killing at least 41 people in the remote mountain village of al-Majalah in Yemen’s Abyan province. The government was purportedly targeting “militants,” but those killed include at least 21 children and 14 women. Entire families were wiped out.

It is the worst reported loss of civilian life from a U.S. targeted killing strike in Yemen to date.

This was the one the Yemeni govt originally tried to take blame for, if not for those wikileaks cables revealing a meeting between Ali Abdullah Saleh and Patreaeus where it was agreed U.S. involvement would be concealed. The ALCU and CCR filed an FOIA request today to learn more.

(via socialuprooting)

Tags: Yemen ACLU drones

occupyallstreets:

Whistleblowing Wednesday: Obama Covers Up War Crimes And Silences The Journalist Who Exposed Him
On Thursday’s “Democracy Now,” reporter Jeremy Scahill and a member of the Committee to Protect Journalists discussed the ongoing imprisonment of a Yemeni journalist, and his connection with President Obama.
Abdulelah Haider Shaye has been in prison since January of 2011. In a new article for The Nation, Scahill placed the blame for Shaye’s continued imprisonment (which has been condemned by many human rights and press freedom groups) squarely on Obama. 
According to Scahill, Obama “expressed concern” about Shaye during a phone call with then-Yemeni president Ali Abdullah Saleh, who had signalled his intent to pardon the journalist and free him. Instead, Shaye remains behind bars, branded as an ally of al Qaeda.
One of Shaye’s biggest scoops was the uncovering of a U.S. missile strike in Yemen. As Scahill wrote:
On December 17, the Yemeni government announced that it had conducted a series of strikes against an al Qaeda training camp in the village of al Majala in Yemen’s southern Abyan province, killing a number of al Qaeda militants. As the story spread across the world, Shaye traveled to al Majala. What he discovered were the remnants of Tomahawk cruise missiles and cluster bombs, neither of which are in the Yemeni military’s arsenal. He photographed the missile parts, some of them bearing the label “Made in the USA,” and distributed the photos to international media outlets. He revealed that among the victims of the strike were women, children and the elderly. To be exact, 14 women and 21 children were killed.
Seven months later, Shaye was abducted by Yemeni intelligence agents, who warned him to stop speaking about the strike. Instead, he went on Al Jazeera to say what had happened to him. A month later, he was arrested and sent to prison in a trial that was widely seen as a sham.
“Democracy Now” showed video of Shaye speaking from a caged cell during his trial. It also showed footage that Scahill took during his reporting in Yemen.
Speaking on Thursday, Scahill said that Shaye had become known for his close access to top al Qaeda figures (which he obtained through his wife’s family ties to a radical cleric) but was trusted by Western media outlets.
Read More

occupyallstreets:

Whistleblowing Wednesday: Obama Covers Up War Crimes And Silences The Journalist Who Exposed Him

On Thursday’s “Democracy Now,” reporter Jeremy Scahill and a member of the Committee to Protect Journalists discussed the ongoing imprisonment of a Yemeni journalist, and his connection with President Obama.

Abdulelah Haider Shaye has been in prison since January of 2011. In a new article for The Nation, Scahill placed the blame for Shaye’s continued imprisonment (which has been condemned by many human rights and press freedom groups) squarely on Obama.

According to Scahill, Obama “expressed concern” about Shaye during a phone call with then-Yemeni president Ali Abdullah Saleh, who had signalled his intent to pardon the journalist and free him. Instead, Shaye remains behind bars, branded as an ally of al Qaeda.

One of Shaye’s biggest scoops was the uncovering of a U.S. missile strike in Yemen. As Scahill wrote:

On December 17, the Yemeni government announced that it had conducted a series of strikes against an al Qaeda training camp in the village of al Majala in Yemen’s southern Abyan province, killing a number of al Qaeda militants. As the story spread across the world, Shaye traveled to al Majala. What he discovered were the remnants of Tomahawk cruise missiles and cluster bombs, neither of which are in the Yemeni military’s arsenal. He photographed the missile parts, some of them bearing the label “Made in the USA,” and distributed the photos to international media outlets. He revealed that among the victims of the strike were women, children and the elderly. To be exact, 14 women and 21 children were killed.

Seven months later, Shaye was abducted by Yemeni intelligence agents, who warned him to stop speaking about the strike. Instead, he went on Al Jazeera to say what had happened to him. A month later, he was arrested and sent to prison in a trial that was widely seen as a sham.

“Democracy Now” showed video of Shaye speaking from a caged cell during his trial. It also showed footage that Scahill took during his reporting in Yemen.

Speaking on Thursday, Scahill said that Shaye had become known for his close access to top al Qaeda figures (which he obtained through his wife’s family ties to a radical cleric) but was trusted by Western media outlets.

Read More

(via anarcho-queer)

thenationmagazine:

Obama Is the Only Person Keeping Abdulelah Haider Shaye in Prison

Last week Jeremy Scahill spoke on Democracy Now! about President Obama’s role in the imprisonment of Abdulelah Haider Shaye, a prominent Yemeni journalist.

For more, see Scahill’s article, “Why Is President Obama Keeping a Journalist in Prison in Yemen?